Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Get Caught!

I know I have said it before. And I will say it again. Get caught reading! Make sure your young child catches you in the act. That means be seen reading the newspaper, a recipe, an election ballot, a paper or study for work. But it also means to provide evidence of reading for pleasure. Point out the stack of books by your bed. Next time you visit the library, take your child on a detour from the children's corner to see the adult stacks. Talk about the book you are reading for enjoyment or the book group you joined. Your impressions of the book you are reading may not be entirely clear to your young child, but the message is: Reading is a source of pleasure for life.

3 comments:

  1. I bet when a child sees their parent reading, this sparks curiosity and not only encourages the child to read, but can be a vehicle for a parent to share what they're reading, creating a wonderful example and a way to further bond with their child. I think children can also feel the boundary between "child" and "parent" and this is a nice way for a parent to let the child feel more adult.

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  2. My children and now my grandchildren always see me reading, and I buy them books as gifts and read to them as much as possible

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  3. Hi there new follower from Bloggy Moms. I am loving your blog so far. So agree with getting caught with a book. So important to build a lifetime of reading by showing them how important it is to you!

    Megan

    http://1funkywoman.blogspot.com

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WHAT I THINK . . .

There are all kinds of readers. Some—like my daughter and me—are never without a book to read for pleasure. Others—like my son—are careful, analytical, and curious readers who read primarily to seek information from the page.


No matter what kind of reader your child becomes, you can help him or her get started. After all, you are your child’s first teacher. And, best of all, you can have some fun in the process.


Please feel free to share your own ideas. Tell me about ways you've enjoyed reading with your child.